Creative Inspiration Things

April 22, 2014 at 8:27pm
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ONE STYLE – Endless Combinations
This CORE by JACK & JONES microsite shows various styling options. As the users interact with an outfit they can see the different styling variations.

ONE STYLE – Endless Combinations

This CORE by JACK & JONES microsite shows various styling options. As the users interact with an outfit they can see the different styling variations.

8:17pm
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The Creativity Top 5: The Best Brand Ideas of the Week

This Week: Snap a Picture, Extend Happy Hour

April 21, 2014 at 8:39pm
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‘Human Error’ is an on-going series by Brooklyn-based graphic designer Victoria Siemer, in which she digitally inserts computer error messages over scanned polaroid films. 
http://designtaxi.com/news/364977/Graphic-Designer-Inserts-Error-Messages-Into-Human-Experiences/

‘Human Error’ is an on-going series by Brooklyn-based graphic designer Victoria Siemer, in which she digitally inserts computer error messages over scanned polaroid films. 

http://designtaxi.com/news/364977/Graphic-Designer-Inserts-Error-Messages-Into-Human-Experiences/

7:35pm
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Dries van Noten, Zuckerman Combine Fashion and Art

From Elsa Schiaparelli and Salvador Dali in the 1930s to Marc Jacobs and Richard Prince, fashion designers and artists joining forces is no new phenomenon. But the movement is surging each season, and now retailers like Barneys New York are also getting on board.

7:33pm
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Hermés Urban playground. Dare to move with the menswear collection for spring-summer 2014.

7:31pm
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Great Branding Is Invisible
“The devil is in the detail” is a cliché that happens to be true, but let’s turn it around: The magic is in the detail. What constitutes quality in a product, besides the raw materials you choose? The attention paid to detail.

Great Branding Is Invisible

“The devil is in the detail” is a cliché that happens to be true, but let’s turn it around: The magic is in the detail. What constitutes quality in a product, besides the raw materials you choose? The attention paid to detail.

7:27pm
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Reblogged from fastcompany
fastcompany:
Steve Matteson has designed some of the most ubiquitous typefaces in the world, and engineered versions of Times New Roman, Arial, and Courier for Microsoft. Here, he reveals why every letter you see looks the way it does. 
Read More>

fastcompany:

Steve Matteson has designed some of the most ubiquitous typefaces in the world, and engineered versions of Times New Roman, Arial, and Courier for Microsoft. Here, he reveals why every letter you see looks the way it does. 

Read More>

7:25pm
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Nike's Fuelband Hits the Wall →

Everyone knew that many of these wearable computers weren’t long for this world. Few predicted that the first big failure would be Nike’s (NKE)Fuelband.

7:21pm
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FRAGRANCES ARE SELLING SURPRISINGLY WELL ONLINE →

Selling fragrance online isn’t easy. Sure, an e-commerce site could be useful to someone looking to quickly restock a favorite perfume, but getting a shopper to sink cash on a scent she hasn’t even smelled? That seems like an impossible task.

7:18pm
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Barneys Launches iPad App →

APP-HAPPY: As part of the continued redesign of its digital presence, Barneys has launched its new iPad app today, which boasts the same shopping functionality found on barneys.com. Features include a personal shopping scheduling tool, synchronized user accounts, push notifications about sales and brand launches, “how-to” GIFs to help withmakeup application and exclusive interviews with the likes of Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsenand Elizabeth Moss. Created in partnership with design firm Fueled, the app is available for free download today at the Apple iTunes store.

February 20, 2014 at 1:24pm
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7 Steps for Putting Ideas Into Action →

A 7-Step Idea Generation Gameplan

As a remedy, the authors—consultants at Innosight, a global strategy and innovation consultancy based in Lexington, Mass.—offer a seven-step gameplan. Its purpose is to help you not only improve your brainstorming, but also to help you put your ideas into action.

1. Define the problem and solution space. The aim here is create boundaries in the idea-generation process. What customer problem are you trying to solve? “Constraining the problem and solution space forces idea generators to delve into an area,” note the authors. “The result is typically a much broader range of ideas that are on target and have real potential to move forward toward impact.”

For example, Innosight recently attempted to solve a problem involving the distribution of drugs for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Along with their partners, they decided to focus on the drug supply chain. This boundary allowed Innosight to deemphasize other problematic areas (drug development, diagnosis, geopolitics).2. Break the problem down. Use a visual technique, like diagramming. For Innosight, this meant mapping each part of the MDR-TB drug supply chain. They then were able to literally see all of the barriers to effective distribution. All told, they identified 12 barriers. 

3. Make the problem personal. How do you make a business problem personal? By getting down in the trenches and observing the individuals who are affected by the problem (and who would also be affected by your proposed solutions). “The goal is to make it as real as possible to the people who will be generating ideas,” they write. 

4. Seek the perspectives of outsiders. In other words, don’t solve the problem in a vacuum.  In this case, Innosight and its partners sought out public health experts, retail supply chain managers, and technology experts. ”Having supply chain experts in each breakout group allowed us to make connections very quickly between specific chokepoints in the MDR-TB system and other supply chains where similar problems have been solved,” they note. 

5. Diverge before you converge. You want to breed some conflict into your discussions. Otherwise—as we all know—a meeting can quickly devolve into a time waster, where precious minutes are lost on the first ideas to be voiced, rather than what might be the best ideas. The solution? ”Start by asking participants to write down as many ideas as they can individually for five to 10 minutes. In our experience, the technique has two benefits. First, it gives introverts—who may be shy about sharing their suggestions in a larger group setting—a chance to maximize their contribution. Second, having lots of ideas on paper before the discussion begins prevents the group from rallying around any specific solution too soon.”

6. Create “idea resumes.” An idea resume is one-page document listing the following attributes: how customers will learn about it or access it; what resources or processes are needed to make it a reality; and how the solution will achieve economic sustainability. The benefit of idea resumes is that (when they’re finished) they allow all involved parties to scan and share ideas, in a way that invites ”apples-to-apples” comparisons and “ensures that ideas are evaluated on their merits rather than on how well they are pitched.”

7. Create a plan to learn. Your ideas, no matter how pristine they appear on their “resumes,” will all contain assumptions that need testing. So the seventh step is to design these tests, and to spell out what you aim to learn from them. “And for businesses hoping to translate ideas into action,” note the authors, “this is where the real work begins.”

1:23pm
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How To Actually Brainstorm Productively →

Researchers at MIT Sloan have figured out a framework to generate ideas that are actionable. The process they’ve come up with entails seven steps.

February 19, 2014 at 1:06pm
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Reblogged from mashable

mashable:

Top Gun, the 1986 Tom Cruise classic, is being retold one screen-grab at a time. Seriously. Starting on Jan. 23 with a blank a picture, Twitter account 555 µHz is tweeting each scene from the movie.

1:06pm
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Reblogged from fastcodesign
fastcodesign:

Russians Are Miserable And Brazilians Love To Smile: What Selfies Reveal About Cultural Stereotypes
"Selfies are an interesting thing to study right now. Are they just a fad, or do they represent a substantial new trend of how we create and share photos? Are they a means of self-expression, a tool of self-promotion, or a cry for attention? And are there any cultural differences in the way people in different countries take selfies?"
More> Co.Design

fastcodesign:

Russians Are Miserable And Brazilians Love To Smile: What Selfies Reveal About Cultural Stereotypes

"Selfies are an interesting thing to study right now. Are they just a fad, or do they represent a substantial new trend of how we create and share photos? Are they a means of self-expression, a tool of self-promotion, or a cry for attention? And are there any cultural differences in the way people in different countries take selfies?"

More> Co.Design

(via fastcompany)

January 13, 2014 at 1:25pm
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Brands Try Live Tutorials Via Google - Digiday →